The New Blue and Red: Educational Split Is Replacing the Culture War

2016, 2016 Presidential Campaign, Demographics, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton

The New York Times takes a look at the educational divide between Democratic and Republican voters, which shows an opportunity for Hillary Clinton to pick up voters in the South and an opportunity for Donald Trump in the Mid-West.

The traditional red-state, blue-state map of the 2000-2012 era was driven in part by cultural issues like abortion and same-sex marriage. Not this year.

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The traditional red-state, blue-state map of the 2000-2012 era was driven in part by culture war politics, which split white voters along religious lines. The country’s religious divisions parallel its regional splits, with religious and evangelical white voters heavily concentrated in the South. The Republicans made huge gains among white working-class voters in the South and Appalachia, but relatively secular and working-class Northern voters in Scranton, Pa., or northern Ohio or Iowa mostly stuck with the Democrats through it all.

But the old culture war is effectively over. There have been few or no campaign advertisements about gay marriage or abortion. This election is a hint of one way things could turn next: a new split between the beneficiaries of multicultural globalism and the working-class ethno-nationalists who feel left behind, both economically and culturally. It wouldn’t divide the country as much by region and religion, but more along the lines of urbanization and education.